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League of Legends: The protector’s pouch

The protector’s pouch

This section is dedicated to the magical pouch that your champion carries around, which contains tools to help you and your Carries in their quest for “Can’t Touch This”, or at least minimises the touching, as Carries who get touched too much by the enemy are dead Carries.

For the game opening, as a Support, I usually go for Faerie Charm, three Sight Wards, two health potions and one mana potion. Three Wards are sufficient to keep your prime ward location warded until your automatic gold generation enables you to get your first GP10 item, which is usually Philosopher’s Stone, and, at the same time, the potions allow you to sustain yourself in your lane to guard your Carry.

The items above are a rough list of the items that are viable options for a Support to purchase, but do remember to prioritise the purchase of Wards and Oracles before you decide to go for end-game Support items.

Aegis of the Legion

This item is very useful if you face an opponent with very balanced damage types of both physical and magical. The team-wide magic-resist and armour-boosting aura can help cut out a significant part of the opponent’s damage on your team, especially if the damage is being done to paper-cannon-type players who go with fully offensive items.

 

Shurelya’s Reverie

One of the items I would recommend most for Support, the two-second instant speed boost for your team, can be used for multiple situations; for instance, chasing fleeing enemies, fleeing from chasing enemies in a disadvantageous fight, and catching up to vulnerable opponents who have placed themselves in a bad position. The utility and usage of this item is limitless, depending on how or when you use it.

 

Randuin’s Omen

This item is exceptionally useful for the Big Daddy-type Support that charges into the fray and disrupts the opponents. Some examples of Big Daddy-type Supports include Alistar, Blitzcrank, Shen, and Taric. It also has its occasional use on ranged Supports, if you wish to have an extra mechanism to keep the enemy Bruisers off your Carries.

 

Soul Shroud

Have a team that is cool-down reliant? You can consider getting Soul Shroud. The 10 percent increased cool-down reduction for your team can help your team thrash out more damage, and teammates that possess juking abilities can use them at faster rates. The extra health it provides also means that you can play a little more recklessly during team clashes, running deeper into enemy lines to cause more disruption at their core.

By Elliot Lucas Marcell, Joshua Lim, Darren Seah

In our new League of Legends-focused training feature, we outline the best ways to take advantage of each of the five important roles in the game.

Hello again, guys. So far, we have covered the broad strokes of what a Support is and how you play them. In this section, I will be recommending two types of Support: the Loving Mother type, and the Big Daddy type.

The Loving Mother type of Support sways more to the side of sustaining the Carry that you are partnered with, while dealing minimal disruption during the lane phase. The Big Daddy Support is the type that charges head on (or makes the enemy “charge”) into the enemy, and hopes that his Attack Damage (AD) Carry is smart enough to assist him whenever he does that. Without further ado, here are my Support recommendations.

 

Zeke’s Herald

This item has surfaced on Supports more often after the nerf on all of the physical life-stealing items. Supports who get this are aiming to help their physical Bruisers and Carries make up for the nerf by purchasing an item that provides a life-steal aura, so that they are able to better sustain themselves in a fight. I recommend getting this towards the later phases of the game, and concentrating more on purchasing other Support items, as it does not provide much utility to the Support itself.

 

Locket of the Iron Solari

This item absorbs up to 230 damage at level 18; it allows your entire team to soak up roughly one extra attack by the opponents, or to save a fleeing ally from a damage-over-time spell, like Ignite, that would otherwise kill them. It’s as useful as a burst-defence mechanism, for example that by Soraka, who can burst-heal a dying teammate and then throw out this item’s shield to cover the entire team.

By Elliot Lucas Marcell, Joshua Lim, Darren Seah

In our new League of Legends-focused training feature, we outline the best ways to take advantage of each of the five important roles in the game.

Hello again, guys. So far, we have covered the broad strokes of what a Support is and how you play them. In this section, I will be recommending two types of Support: the Loving Mother type, and the Big Daddy type.

The Loving Mother type of Support sways more to the side of sustaining the Carry that you are partnered with, while dealing minimal disruption during the lane phase. The Big Daddy Support is the type that charges head on (or makes the enemy “charge”) into the enemy, and hopes that his Attack Damage (AD) Carry is smart enough to assist him whenever he does that. Without further ado, here are my Support recommendations.

The Loving Mothers

Soraka, the Starchild

Soraka is right now said to be the strongest Support champion in the game. Although her auto-attack looks like bananas, that humour is made up for by her incredible healing capabilities. She currently has the best burst heals, and also very sustainable lane management. Infuse doubles as a silence if cast on an opponent, or is a very nice mana-restoration device for your allies.

Considered a fully defensive type of Support, her heals can burst up a Carry from critical to full health, with a combination of her two healing spells, which, at level 18, and without any ability power items, heals for a whopping 800 health! Her weakness is that her offensive capabilities in the team are comparable to using a daisy as a weapon. So, if you do decide to try her out, make sure that you stand out of enemy fire, and just try to keep your team alive with all of the regenerative spells that you possess.

I recommend building cool-down reduction items on her, as her heal has a rather long cool-down period. It is a wonderful healing spell, which provides armour on her target, so the more times you can cast it, the better.

 

Sona, Maven of the Strings

Sona is extremely squishy, but what she lacks in defensive stats, she makes up for in team utility. She is the Queen of Auras; all of her three basic spells have an active effect and a persistent aura that have their own form of beneficial stats to improve the combat capabilities of her allies. She can choose between three types of auras, and change them around to adapt to the situation: Offensive Aura, Defensive Aura, and Mobility Aura.

Her ultimate attack is also extremely useful and cute to boot; it is an AOE stun that forces opponents hit by it to start dancing. A good use of her ultimate attack can easily turn the tides of an engage in your favour. So, if you’re feeling lazy and want to minimise the use of your mouse, then Sona is the champion for you.

 

Taric, the Gem Knight

“Sparkling Man” is the name of this guy’s game; he sparkles brightly and is proud of it. He is actually midway between a Loving Mother and a Big Daddy, but I have decided to put him in the Loving Mother section, as his skills are targeted more towards the defensive side. Of course, they can be used offensively, as well. Taric is the only Support champion with a consistent stun.

The stun is superbly useful in helping your AD Carry land his skill shot, and the stun also greatly increases the odds of your jungler being able to pull off a successful gank. At the early stages of the game, he enjoys having picnics in the brush, and throwing diamonds at his enemies, which stuns them if they wander around his vicinity.

Towards the later parts of the game, you can build him on the tankier side, so that he can be a front-liner. His ability to do so is why he does contain elements of the “Big Daddy” Support champions. While he cannot be a superb tank, he is able to soak up quite a bit of damage. His natural armour is rather high. Don’t forget that his heals on his allies also heal himself.

The Big Daddies

Alistar, the Minotaur

This Big Daddy is an angry, rampaging bull equipped with horns and a huge, muscular body. Nonetheless, Alistar’s speciality lies not in being able to punch people’s faces in, but in his ability to consistently disrupt the enemies through knockbacks and AOE stuns. He also has a small AOE healing spell called Triumphant Roar that is useful at early stages of the game, as it helps sustain your AD Carry.

I rate him at 7/10, because mastering his Headbutt-to-Pulverise combo does require quite a bit of skill and practice. This two-spell combo works like a mini Unstoppable Force, and you guys know how much disruption a single unstoppable force can cause. Imagine it happening once every 10 seconds during a team clash. It’s hard to grab this bull by his horns.

Blitzcrank, the Great Steam Golem

While other Big Daddies like charging into enemy lines, Blitzcrank likes making people charge to him–most of the time, against their will. A good Blitzcrank can turn an Insanity Wolf into Paranoid Parrot in a lane. Blitzcrank is the king of zoning at bottom lane when coupled with an AD carry that has higher damage at the early stages of the game.

His Rocket Grab to Power Fist combo can easily cut the opponent’s Carry’s life by over 50 percent if his partner supports him, and, most of the time, forcing the enemy to burn their Summoner Spell Flash, making them easy targets for future ganks. But his weakness lies in not being able to sustain either him or his Carry in the lane, as he has neither an active healing nor a shielding spell. If your opponents are able to out-harass you and your Carry, both of you will suffer in the lane together.

That’s it for the coverage of our ever-so-handy Support champions. Go out there to the Fields of Justice and raise your kids into strong and capable fighters to win you those games. Just be warned: parenting is not an easy job. Good luck, Summoners!

This part of the guide is courtesy of Darren Seah, another avid League of Legends player, who is largely involved with the Singapore LoL community, via EqualsD Gaming.

What is an AD Carry? Here’s a poem to describe an AD Carry’s life:

They see him farmin’, they hatin’,
And in the late game they scream, “holy sheet just kill him”,
Come on guys, let’s all just aim him,
Look at him, he’s so paper thin,
Holy crap, he needs to be pinned,
Aced! Never mind…

The AD Carries are like the diamonds in the rough. They start out ridiculously weak compared to most other roles, but their damage just scales out of control once they have sufficient level and items. This guide is dedicated to teaching you newbie AD Carry-wannabes to be the smallest, yet most kick-ass guy there is on the playground. And once again, this guide is targeted for the newer players to League of Legends, and there might be some stuff that is so fundamental, that most people cannot help but pin-point and rage on it.